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SORRY WE MISSED YOU

Updated: Mar 6

Debbie Honeywood, Rhys Stone, Katie Proctor, and Kris Hitchen in Sorry We Missed You


Pacific Northwest Pictures is excited to announce the Canadian theatrical release of Ken Loach's SORRY WE MISSED YOU


OPENS Friday, March 6th, 2020 IN TORONTO & VANCOUVER



DIRECTED BY: Ken Loach SCREENPLAY BY:  Paul Laverty


Katie Proctor and Kris Hitchen in Sorry We Missed You (2019) STARRING: Kris Hitchen, Debbie Honeywood, Rhys Stone, Katie Proctor, and Ross Brewster PRODUCER: Rebecca O'Brien


Ricky, Abby and their two children live in Newcastle. They are a strong family who care for each other. Ricky has skipped from one labouring job to another while Abby, who loves her work, cares for old people. Despite working longer and harder they realise they will never have independence or their own home. It’s now or never; the app revolution offers Ricky a golden opportunity. He and Abby make a bet. She sells her car so Ricky can buy a shiny new van and become a freelance driver, with his own business at last. The modern world impinges on these four souls in the privacy of their kitchen; the future beckons.


Sorry We Missed You is a 2019 British-French-Belgian drama film directed by Ken Loach, written by Paul Laverty and produced by Rebecca O'Brien.



Principal photography began in September 2018 in the Newcastle area in north-east England. It was selected to compete for the Palme d'Or at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival.


Despite having a broken arm in a sling, Loach appeared to promote the film at Cannes, where he said that it would be his final film to compete at the festival. At the 10th Magritte Awards, Sorry We Missed You received the Magritte Award for Best Foreign Film in Coproduction.


On Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 84% based on 82 reviews, with an average rating of 7.58/10. The site's critical consensus reads "Sorry We Missed You may strike some as tending toward the righteously didactic, but director Ken Loach's passionate approach remains effective."Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, assigned the film a score of 79 out of 100, based on 16 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".



David Rooney in The Hollywood Reporter wrote that the film "is an expertly judged and profoundly humane movie, made without frills or fuss but startlingly direct in its emotional depiction of the tough stuff that is the fiber of so many ordinary lives.


Peter Bradshaw in The Guardian believed it was superior to Loach's previous film I, Daniel Blake (2016), which won the Palme d'Or at Cannes. Bradshaw wrote: "it is more dramatically varied and digested, with more light and shade in its narrative progress and more for the cast to do collectively. I was hit in the solar plexus by this movie, wiped out by the simple honesty and integrity of the performances." The review in The Times praised the performance of newcomer Debbie Honeywood as Abbie, who was cast after a talent search of non-professionals. Contributor Kevin Maher believed the film should have concentrated on her character instead of Ricky, Abbie's husband.



Geoffrey Macnab wrote in The Independent that Loach's film "captures brilliantly the alienation and existential anguish that its main characters feel. There is nothing they can do to help themselves. The more they fight to change their circumstances, the worse those circumstances become."Macnab commented that Loach and his screenwriter Laverty "pursue their story to its logical conclusion, ending the film in a way that is both ingenious and devastating."



Owen Gleiberman of Variety writes: "Loach stages all of this with supreme confidence and flow" leading to "a fraught, touching, and galvanizing movie." Raphael Abrahams, in his review for the Financial Times, states: "In the end credits he [Loach] gives thanks to those drivers whose testimony informed the film but who wished to remain anonymous. He is their much-needed voice and remains that of our moral conscience."


Trevor Johnston of British film publication Sight & Sound wrote "While Sorry We Missed You may not be as sentimentally affecting as [I, Daniel Blake], it delivers a more nuanced, troubling and provocative state-of-the-nation address. As such, it’s surely among Loach and Laverty’s most sinewy efforts."



Screening Friday, March 6th, 2020

TORONTO  VANCOUVER VICTORIA CALGARY WATERLOO  HAMILTON Friday, March 13, 2020

EDMONTON SASKATOON REGINA KINGSTON Friday, April 17, 2020 OTTAWA


COURTESY OF TARO PR AND IMDB

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